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Utah Vehicle Registration

Utah Vehicle Registration

The state of Utah requires vehicle owners to complete the Utah vehicle registration process for their vehicles. Vehicles must be properly titled and registered before being allowed to be driven on Utah highways and roads.
Utah Vehicle Registration for New Utah Residents
New residents to the state of Utah are allowed sixty (60) days to transfer their vehicle titles and registrations. In order to transfer them to Utah vehicle registrations and titles, new Utah residents must provide the existing vehicle title (unless it held by a lien holder in a financing agreement as collateral) and the most recent out-of-state registration. 
All motor vehicles that are undergoing the Utah vehicle registration and titling process for the first time are required by Utah law to have a Vehicle Identification Number inspection done. Form TC-661, or the Certificate of Inspection, has to be completed by a Division of Motor Vehicles employee, designated contractor, licensed dealer, peace officer, or a certified safety inspector. This can also be completed by a Division of Motor Vehicles employee at the time of your UT registration.
Utah Vehicle Registration Renewal
Utah vehicle registrations are renewed each year, and official renewal notices are mailed by the Division of Motor vehicles several weeks before to your UT vehicle registration expiration date in order to help you remember to renew your UT registration. Renewing your UT registration is a very simple process.
You have many different options for renewing your Utah vehicle registration. The most convenient way to renew your UT registration is by renewing it online through the RenewalExpress service provided by the Division of Motor Vehicles. Alternatively, you can go to a local inspection station that can complete your vehicle inspections, but also renew your UT vehicle registration. You can also go to your local Department of Motor Vehicles to renew your Utah vehicle registration office or return the UT registration renewal notice with your applicable inspection certificates and UT registration fee payment by mail.
Utah Vehicle Registration Fees
The amount you fees need to pay at the time of your Utah vehicle registration is based on the vehicle type, county, fuel type, and other factors. The taxes and fees that are assessed by the Division of Motor Vehicles during your UT vehicle registration can include the following:
• Registration fees based on the car type, weight, county of residence, and other factors
• Uniform fees
• Sales and use taxes based on the purchase price of the vehicle
• Temporary and in-transit permits & fees
• Vehicle titles and fees
• License plate fees 
• Automobile driver education fee of $2.50
• Uninsured motorist identification fee $1 annually

Vermont Vehicle Registration

Vermont Vehicle Registration

The state of Vermont requires vehicle owners to complete the Vermont vehicle registration process for their vehicles. Motor vehicles must be properly titled and registered with the Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles before being allowed to be driven on Vermont highways and roads. The state requires passenger cars, all terrain, farm vehicles, motorcycles, municipal vehicles, tractors, trucks, and others to have proper VT registration.
Vermont Vehicle Registration for New Vermont Residents
All new Vermont residents must obtain a Vermont vehicle registration after establishing residency in the state. This has to be done no longer than sixty (60) days after moving to the state of Vermont or if your vehicle’s out-of-state registration expires before this period of time. 
In order to get your Vermont vehicle registration, you must provide the Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles with the following documents and information: 
• A Filled out Registration Application form for your VT vehicle registration.
• The vehicle title. If the vehicle title is held by a lien holder, you must provide the full name and address of the vehicle’s lien holder and the original vehicle registration from the previous state.
• A current odometer reading for the VT registration process.
• Proof of the payment of tax paid on the vehicle in the previous state. This is not necessary if the vehicle is more than 3 years old and you have proof of registration or vehicle title for the past 3 years.
• Vehicle Identification Number Verification.
• Payment of fees and taxes.
• Proof of sufficient liability insurance coverage for a Vermont vehicle registration.
After completing the Vermont vehicle registration process you will have 15 days to get an inspection at a Vermont Licensed Inspection Station. During the first-time VT vehicle registration process, you will also be issued new Vermont license plates.
Renewing a Vermont Vehicle Registration
Vermont requires all VT registrations to be renewed. This can be done online, in person at the main Department of Motor Vehicles office or participating town clerk’s office, at a self-serve kiosk at most branch offices in Vermont, or by mail.
Vermont registrants normally receive a computer-generated VT registration renewal application in the mail about 3 weeks before the current registration expires. Vehicle owners can then sign the VT vehicle registration renewal application and return with the renewal fee necessary. 
Your renewed vehicle registration will consist of the Vermont vehicle registration certificate and decals which must be placed on your license.
Vermont Vehicle Registration Fees
There are applicable fees for the VT vehicle registration process. All of these payments must be made as either checks or money orders to the Department of Motor Vehicles. These fees include the following:
• Registration fees: Depend on the type of vehicle and the period of registration.
• License plate fees: Standard t plate fee is $5, replacement plates are $10, and specialty plates have various prices depending on style.
• Tax and title fees

Virginia Vehicle Registration

Virginia Vehicle Registration

Before you get on the road with your motor vehicle, tractor truck, trailer, motorcycle, or semitrailer, you are required by law to properly title your vehicle and apply for Virginia vehicle registration at a Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles office. In order to do so, you will need to provide additional information to correctly complete your Virginia vehicle registration and titling if you are a new resident or if you lease your motor vehicle.
Your motor vehicle has to pass an annual safety inspection and show a valid safety inspection decal before it can be operated in the state Virginia. Violating Virginia inspection laws can result in a severe fine and a mark on your driving record. Because of this, you must get an inspection as a part of your VA vehicle registration.
First-Time Virginia Vehicle Registration
Before starting the Virginia vehicle registration process, you must have the following documents available:
• Have your vehicle titled in Virginia for your VA vehicle registration.
• Complete Form VSA 14 Application for Registration or Form VSA 123 Hire Vehicles Registration Application for your VA registration.
• An emissions inspection for your vehicle if you are in Arlington, Loudoun, Stratford, Fairfax, or Prince William County, or in the cities of Fairfax, Alexandria, Falls Church, Manassas Park, or Manassas. Motorcycles do not need to have an emissions inspection completed for a VA registration.
• Proof of liability insurance for your vehicle. Your policy must meet minimum requirements placed for the VA vehicle registration process or you must pay the uninsured vehicle fee. Your insurance carrier has to be authorized to provide insurance in the state of Virginia. Minimum coverage includes $25,000 for one person’s bodily injury/death, $50,000 for two people’s bodily injury/death, and $20,000 for property damage.
Virginia Vehicle Registration Fees
Your VA vehicle registration fees depend on the type of vehicle its weight. Common VA vehicle registration fees and additional fees include the following:
• Passenger vehicle up to 4,000 pounds: $40.75
• Passenger over 4,000 pounds: $45.75
• Motorcycle: $28.75
• Pickup Truck up to 4,000 pounds: $40.75
• Pickup Truck over 4,000 pounds gross weight: $45.75
• Pickup Truck between 6,501-7,500 pounds gross weight: $51.75
• Trip Permit: $5.00
• Replacement Virginia vehicle registration card: $2.00
• VA vehicle Registration transfer fee $2.00
You can pay your VA vehicle registration fees with cash, check, e-check, check card, credit card, or money order. The Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles accepts MasterCard, Discover, Visa and American Express for all fees. 
Virginia Vehicle Registration Renewal
After your first VA vehicle registration, the Department of Motor Vehicles will notify you about your upcoming VA registration renewal. You can get these notifications either by mail, email, text message, or phone by signing up for these e-notifications. Virginia provides you with the option to renew your VA registration by online, telephone, by mail, or at any Department of Motor Vehicles select center.  If you choose to renew your VA vehicle registration in person, there is an additional $5 fee.

Washington Vehicle Registration

Washington Vehicle Registration

The state of Washington requires vehicle owners to complete the Washington vehicle registration process for their vehicles. Motor vehicles must be properly titled and registered with the Washington State Department of Licensing before being allowed to be driven on Washington highways and roads. 
First Time Washington Vehicle Registration
When you become a resident of Washington State, you have thirty (30) days to correctly title your vehicle and apply for Washington vehicle register. Once you do so, you will be given Washington license plates. In order to complete the WA vehicle registration process, you can submit your application to your local vehicle licensing office either in person or by mail.
First Time Washington Vehicle Registration in Person
Before beginning the WA registration process, you must make sure you meet all the requirements that are applicable apply to your motor vehicle.  If your motor vehicle is a 2009 model or newer SUV, passenger van, or light-duty truck, it must meet necessary emission standards in order to receive its WA vehicle registration.
If your motor vehicle is ten years old or newer, you must also submit the Odometer Disclosure Statement along with your WA registration application. In certain counties of Washington, you may also need to submit the results of an emissions test for your vehicle. 
If the vehicle weight is not on your title, you may have to present a weight slip for your vehicle for your Washington vehicle registration. You may be able to get this from your local vehicle licensing office. 
Once you have satisfied all of these requirements for the WA vehicle registration, you can go to a Department of licensing office and present the following documents and forms:
• Out-of-state title or photocopy if there is a lien holder.
• Vehicle Certificate of Ownership Application. This must be signed by all registered owners.
• Applicable fees must be paid as well. These fees depend on your jurisdiction, weight of your vehicle, and choice of license plates. 
First Time Washington Vehicle Registration by Mail
You must still meet all the special requirements discussed in the previous section. You can then submit the following documents by mail for your Washington vehicle registration: 
• Out-of-state vehicle title or a photocopy of the title if there is a lien holder. 
• Notarized Vehicle Certificate of Ownership Application with all registered owner signature.
• Applicable Washington vehicle registration fees 
You can mail your Washington vehicle registration application and relevant documents and fees to any vehicle licensing office location.
Washington Vehicle Registration Fees
WA registration and title fees depend on many factors, including vehicle weight, jurisdiction, and plates. If you are registering for the first time, you should contact your local vehicle licensing office to find out the cost of WA registration.
Renewing Your Washington Vehicle Registration
While the state of Washington sends renewal notices, you can renew your registration without it either by mail, in person, or online. You can renew your registration up to six months before your current WA vehicle registration’s expiration date. Renewal fees depend on the type of WA vehicle registration, weight, and other factors. Some common Washington vehicle registration fees include the following:
• Passenger vehicles up to 4,000 pounds: $43.75
• Passenger vehicles between 4,001 and 6,000 pounds: $53.75
• Passenger vehicles between 6,001 and 8,000 pounds: $63.75
• Motorcycles: $43.75
• Subagent fee at a licensing office: $5

West Virginia Vehicle Registration

West Virginia Vehicle Registration

Residents of the state of West Virginia must properly title and register their motor vehicles with the West Virginia Division of Motor Vehicles. Motor vehicles without any liens can be titled and registered either by mail or in person at a Division of Motor Vehicles Regional Offices or at a privately-owned license services. A car dealer can also take care of the necessary paperwork for a West Virginia Vehicle registration on your behalf.
West Virginia Vehicle Registration for New West Virginia Residents
New residents of West Virginia must title their vehicles and obtain a West Virginia vehicle registration within thirty days of establishing residency in the state. 
If you are a new resident of West Virginia and your vehicle has an out-of-state title in your name and there is no lien holder on the vehicle title, you must submit the following documents for your West Virginia Vehicle registration:
• Out-of-state title for a VA vehicle registration.
• Form DMV-1-TR, West Virginia title application for a VA registration.
• Form DMV-TM-1, Odometer disclosure statement
• Insurance information for the VA vehicle registration.
If you are a new resident of West Virginia and your vehicle title is held by a lien holder, you must provide the following documents for your West Virginia Vehicle Registration:
• Form DMV-1-TR Application for Certificate of Title for a VA vehicle registration.
• Form DMV-TM-1 Odometer disclosure statement for a VA registration.
• Insurance information, this can be on the title application.
• A copy of the vehicle title or an electronic lien printout of your out-of-state vehicle title. If these are not available you can use a letter from your lien holder for your VA registration.
West Virginia Vehicle Registration Fees
The fees for an initial VA vehicle registration include a standard registration fee of $30, $10 title fee, and a $5 lien fee if it is applicable. There is also normally a 5% sales tax for titling on the vehicles’ value, but it does not apply to new residents of West Virginia who have a vehicle titled in another state. 
West Virginia Registration Renewal
WV vehicle registration renewal notices are sent by the Division of Motor Vehicles for your registration by mail approximately thirty days before the WV registration expires. The accompanying renewal form can be returned with the insurance information, personal property tax receipt, and appropriate fee by mail. Alternatively, WV registrations can also be completed through a Division of Motor Vehicles regional office. Furthermore, county sheriff offices can also renew passenger vehicles and motorcycle WV registrations.

Wyoming Vehicle Registration

Wyoming Vehicle Registration

The state of Wyoming requires motor vehicle owners to complete the Wyoming vehicle registration process for their motor vehicles. All motor vehicles must be titled and registered properly with the Wyoming Department of Motor Vehicles before being allowed to be driven on Wyoming highways and roads. The state requires passenger cars, farm vehicles, motorcycles, municipal vehicles, tractors, trucks, and others to have proper WY registration.
Wyoming Vehicle Registration for New Wyoming Residents
All brand new residents of the state of Wyoming must obtain a Wyoming vehicle registration after establishing residency in the state. If you have bought a motor vehicle from a private party, you are given thirty (30) days to complete Wyoming vehicle registration. If you purchase a  motor vehicle from a dealer, you must have your official Wyoming vehicle registration within fifty (50) days.
In order to get your Wyoming vehicle registration, you must provide the Wyoming Department of Transportation the following documents and information: 
 A properly signed vehicle title. New Wyoming residents must apply for a title before they can register their motor vehicles. If the title is lost, destroyed, or stolen, you can apply for a brand new title.
 Bill of sale if the vehicle is changing ownership.
 Proof of proper Wyoming insurance.
 Current vehicle registration certificate from out of state issuer for new Wyoming residents only.
 A completed Vehicle Identification Number inspection affidavit for new residents, which is available at your local county treasurer’s office .
Wyoming Vehicle Registration Fees

Although each specific county handles Wyoming vehicle registration for its residents, Wyoming vehicle registration fees are determined by the state laws. Typical charges for a WY registration will include:
 State WY vehicle registration fee, which is based on the type of vehicle 
 Local County registration fee, which is based on the suggested retail value of the motor vehicle and the age of the vehicle
 License plate fees, if you plan to get specialty or personalized plates
 Sales tax, if the motor vehicle is a brand new purchase and you have not paid tax on it before
Renewing a Wyoming Vehicle Registration 
In order to drive your vehicle in Wyoming , you must renew your Wyoming vehicle registration annually with the Department of Transportation. In addition, Wyoming law requires that you maintain car insurance of the vehicle as well. You will receive a notice that will show your fee. The Wyoming County Treasurer’s Association helps explain the fees with a fee calculator if you cannot wait for your notice to arrive. You can renew your vehicle registration in person or on mail. Certain counties in Wyoming will allow you to complete a WY vehicle registration online.

Everything to Know About VIN’s

Everything to Know About VIN's

What is a VIN?
A Vehicle Identification Number, commonly referred to as a VIN, is a unique serial number which is used by the automotive industry in order to identify individual vehicles. There are various vehicle history services provided in several countries that may help potential car owners use their VIN to find potentially defective or branded vehicles.  Recently VINs are issued as 17 digit serials. Not only can a VIN displays a vehicle’s uniqueness and heritage, a VIN can also be used to track registrations, recalls, warranty claims, insurance coverage and thefts. Each digit or character of a VIN has a specific purpose.
History of the VIN
The VIN was first used in 1954. Detroit automobile manufacturers first began stamping and casting VINs on cars and their parts.  The original purpose of the VIN was to give an accurate idea of the vehicle when mass production amounts were starting to scale significantly. Between 1954 and 1981, there were no accepted standards for the VIN, so different auto manufacturers used different formats to issue VINs to vehicles.
In 1981, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (USDOT) of the United States standardized the format for VINs. They required all road vehicles to have a 17 character VIN, which established the standard VIN system. These VINs could not include the letters I, O, or Q.
The VIN standard was originally described in February 1977 in ISO Standard 3779 and revised last in 1983. The standard VIN system was designed to identify motor vehicles, motorcycles, mopeds and trailers as well. 
What is a VIN Inspection?
A VIN inspection is a standard physical examination of your motor vehicle in order to determine whether the VIN of the vehicle matches the VIN listed on the vehicle’s title or main ownership document. The VIN inspection is usually performed by an authorized inspector, such as a DMV employee or a dealer.
During a VIN inspection, a motor vehicle is physically examined to ensure that the VIN matches the documentation presented during a title or registration transaction. The actual VIN sticker and plate are also checked in to order make sure they both are authentic and match the documentation of the vehicle. The VIN is also checked against various state and federal databases of stole cars. The VIN inspection is not used for determining the safety of a motor vehicle or its parts. 
Where to Find a VIN
The VIN of a vehicle can be found by looking at the vehicle’s dashboard on the driver side. If you are unable to find the VIN, you can open the driver side door and check at the door post (the point where the vehicle door latches when the door is closed). It is very likely that the VIN is also displayed in this location of the vehicle. If you still cannot find the VIN of the vehicle, you may want to check the following spots: 
• Left hand inner wheel arch
• Firewall of the vehicle
• Machined pad on front of engine
• Radiator support bracket
• Steering column
• Passenger or driver side  door or post
• Dash by windshield
• Guarantee & Maintenance Book or other vehicle book
For vehicles with later model years, the most common areas to find the VIN of your vehicle are on:
• Drivers door  or post 
• Left instrumentation/dash plate by window
• Firewall
Types of VIN
There are at least four different competing standards used to calculate VIN:
• FMVSS 115, Section 565: Used in both United States and Canada
• ISO Standard 3779: Used mostly Europe, but also other parts of the world
• SAE J853: Quite similar to the ISO standard
• ADR 61/2: used only in Australia, looking back at ISO 3779 and 3780.
Parts of a VIN
Modern-day VIN systems are based on two different but related standards, originally given by the International Organization for Standardization in 1979 and again in 1980; ISO 3779 and 3780, respectively. Different but compatible uses of these ISO standards have been set up and used by the United States of America and the European Union.
• ISO 3770
o World Manufacturer Identifier (characters 1-3)
o VDS (characters 4-9)
o VIS (characters 10-17)
• More than 500 vehicles/year in European Union and North America
o World Manufacturer Identifier (characters 1-3)
o Vehicle attributes (characters 4-8)
o Check Digit (character 9)
o Model year (character 10)
o Plant code (character 11)
o Sequential number (character 12-17)
• Less than 500 vehicles/year in European Union and North America
o World Manufacturer Identifier (characters 1-3)
o Vehicle attributes (characters 4-8)
o Check Digit (character 9)
o Model year (character 10)
o Plant code (character 11)
o Manufacturer Identifier (character 12-14)
o Sequential number (character 15-17)
The World Manufacturer Identifier of a VIN
The very first three characters identify the manufacturer of the vehicle uniquely using the World Manufacturer Identifier, also called the WMI code. Any manufacturer that builds less than 500 vehicles per year uses the number 9 as the third digit of the VIN, and the 12-14th position of the VIN as the second part of the manufacturer’s identification. Sometimes, manufacturers will use the third character of a VIN as a code for a division within a manufacturer, a vehicle category, or both. For example, within the identifier 1G, which is assigned to General Motors in the US, 1G1 are Chevrolet passenger cars, 1G2 are Pontiac passenger cars, and 1GC are Chevrolet trucks.
The first character of the World Manufacturer Identifier is the area region where the manufacturer is located. In practice, each VIN is assigned to a country where vehicles are manufactured. The only exception to this is in Europe. In Europe, the country where the continental headquarters is located can assign the World Manufacturer Identifier to all the vehicles produced in that area. For example, GM Europe cars have the identifier W0 whether they are produced in Germany, UK, Belgium, Spain or Poland since the GM headquarters is based in Germany.
The Vehicle Descriptor Section of a VIN
The 4th to 9th character in the VIN are together known as the Vehicle Descriptor Section or the VDS. This is used in order to identify the vehicle type, and can include information regarding the automobile platform used, the body style, and the model. Each vehicle manufacturer has a unique way of using this field. Since the 1980’s, most manufacturers have used the eighth digit to classify the engine type of the vehicle whenever there are multiple engine choices for the motor vehicle.  One element of this descriptor that is fairly consistent is the use of the ninth position as a check digit, which is compulsory for vehicles in North America, and is often followed in countries where this is not mandatory.
The Vehicle Identifier Section of a VIN
The tenth to seventeenth positions of the VIN are used as the Vehicle Identifier Section. This section is used by the vehicle manufacturer to identify the specific vehicle in question. This can include any information on engine and transmission choices or on options installed, but more often, this is a simple sequential number. In the United States and other North American countries, the last five digits of the VIN must be numeric.
One very consistent element of the Vehicle Identifier Section is the tenth digit, which is needed worldwide to include the model year of the motor vehicle. Besides the three letter characters that are not allowed in the VIN (I, O, Q), the digit 0 and the letters U and Z are never used for the model year code. 
Some manufacturers such as General Motors and Chrysler encoded the year 1980 as “A” (since the VIN wasn’t mandatory until the next year, and the zero or “A” was found in the manufacturer’s pre-1981 placement in the VIN). However, AMC and Ford still used a zero for any 1980 model cars. Subsequent increment in years occurred through the allowed letters, so that now the year 2000 is represented by the letter “Y”. The years 2001 through 2009 are encoded as the digits from 1 to 9, and all subsequent years are encoded as “A”, “B”, “C”, etc.
On April 30, 2008, the United States National Highway Traffic Safety Administration adopted a rule which amended 49 CFR Part 565, allowing the current 17 character length VIN to continue in use for at least another thirty years, in the process changing several aspects to the VIN requirements applicable to any motor vehicles built for sale in the United States. There are three major notable changes to the VIN system that affects VIN deciphering systems:
The make of the vehicle can only be identified after examining positions 1 through 3 and another position, as given by the manufacturer of the vehicle in the second section or positions 4 through 8 of the VIN.
In order to properly identify exact year of passenger cars or multipurpose passenger vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pounds or less, one must look at position 7 along with position 10 of the VIN. For passenger cars or multipurpose passenger vehicles and trucks that have a gross vehicle weight rating less than 10,000 pounds, if position 7 of the VIN is numeric, the model year of the vehicle in position 10 of the VIN points out a year in the range between 1980 and 2009. If position 7 is an alphabetic character, the model year in position 10 of the vehicle’s VIN refers to a specific year in a range between 2010 and 2039.
The model year for any vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating which exceeds 10,000 pounds as well as motorcycles, trailers, buses, and low speed vehicles can no longer be identified with a VIN within a 30-year range. VIN positions 1 through 8 and 10 that were assigned between 1980 and 2009 can be repeated after the 2010 model year.
Another always -used element of a VIN, which is mandatory in North America, is the use of the eleventh character to include the factory of manufacture of the motor vehicle. Although each specific manufacturer has its own specific set of plant codes, the location of this code in the VIN is standardized.
Calculation to Validate a VIN
If you are trying to validate your vehicle’s VIN with a check digit, there are different options. You can either remove the check digit of the VIN for the purpose of calculation, or you can cancel it out. You must later compare the original value of this check digit with the calculated value of the check digit. If the two values do not match up and there is no calculation error, that means there is a mistake within the VIN. However, a match between the two does not actually prove the VIN is correct because according to the odds, there is still a 1 in 11 chance that any two separate VINs will have a matching check digit. 
Using a VIN to Buy a Car
The VIN of a vehicle can be very important for identifying a vehicle and learning more about its history. Many services will provide you helpful a vehicle history report based on a VIN number. Some things you can learn from these reports include the following:
• Vehicle registration
• Title information, including junked or salvaged titles
• Odometer readings
• Total loss accident history
• Lemon history
• Accident indicators, such as airbag deployments or other indicators
• Frame/structural damage
• Service and repair information 
• Recall information
• Vehicle usage (rental, taxi lease, etc.)
You should also be careful of crooked sellers and dealers who may provide the wrong VIN in an online listing or those who refuse to provide the VIN. The 17 character VIN has become a tool of empowerment for byers seeking potential vehicles to purchase. 

A Guide to Motorcycle Helmet Laws

A Guide to Motorcycle Helmet Laws

Compared with passenger cars, motorcycles are much more dangerous as a form of travel. The United States federal government estimates that in 2007, for each mile traveled, the total number of deaths on motorcycles was about 37 times more than the number of deaths in cars. There were 5,112 deaths among motorcyclists in 2008 and 4,281 deaths in 2009. 
Often, motorcycles have excessive performance capabilities, such as rapid acceleration and high top speeds. Motorcycles are not as stable as cars in emergency braking situations and are less visible to other motorists. Motorcyclists are much more prone to accident injuries than car occupants since motorcycles are unenclosed, leaving motorcycles riders more vulnerable to contact with the road surfaces. This is why wearing protective clothing and helmets, is so important for motorcycle riders.
Helmets laws aim to work as a countermeasure for crash-related head injuries, which is a leading cause of death among riders who do not wear a helmet. Many other countries have helmet laws requiring all motorcyclists to wear helmets while riding, but less than half of the states in America have helmet laws in place. Many other states require certain riders to wear helmets under their helmet laws, but a few other states do not have any helmet laws in place.
Effectiveness of Helmet Laws
Based on various studies looking at the effects of states’ repeal, weakening, and enactment of universal helmet laws, helmet use get closer to 100 percent when all motorcyclists are required to wear helmets. This is compared to approximately 50 percent of motorcyclists using helmets when no helmet law is applicable. According to a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in 2010, 98 percent of motorcyclists were observed to wear helmets in states with universal helmet laws. In states without universal helmet laws, helmet use was only 48 percent in 2010. When considering helmets that were compliant with federal safety regulations, proper helmet use was at 76 percent in 2010 in states with universal helmet laws, as opposed to 40 percent in states without universal helmet laws.
Helmet Laws in the United States
Currently, 47 states as well as Guam, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the United States Virgin Islands have helmet laws in place for motorcyclists. Out of these states with helmet laws, 20 of the states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the United States Virgin Islands have a helmet law that is universal for all riders. The other 27 states as well as Guam have specific helmet specifications. Only three states do not have motorcycle helmet laws at all. These states are Illinois, Iowa, and New Hampshire.
States by State Helmet Laws 
• States with universal helmet laws: Alabama, California, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin
• States with partial Laws: Alaska (17 and younger), Arizona (17 and younger), Arkansas (20 and younger), Colorado (17 and younger for both drivers and passengers), Connecticut (17 and younger), Delaware (18 and younger), Florida (20 and younger), Hawaii (17 and younger), Idaho (17 and younger), Indiana (17 and younger), Kansas (17 and younger), Kentucky (20 and younger), Maine (17 and younger), Minnesota (17 and younger), Montana (17 and younger), New Mexico (17 and younger), North Dakota (17 and younger), Ohio  (17 and younger), Oklahoma (17 and younger), Pennsylvania (20 and younger), Rhode Island (20 and younger), South Carolina (20 and younger), South Dakota (17 and younger), Texas (20 and younger), Utah (17 and younger), Wisconsin (17 and younger), Wyoming (17 and younger)

South Dakota Vehicle Registration

South Dakota Vehicle Registration

All vehicles in the state of South Dakota must be properly titled and have SD vehicle registrations in order to operate legally on South Dakota roadways. Any nonresident who is moving into the state of South Dakota has 90 days to apply for SD registration and title a vehicle. A title is the legal document that declares the ownership of the motor vehicle.  Whenever a motor vehicle is sold, the title has to be transferred to the buyer of the vehicle. This is required for a South Dakota Vehicle Registration.
South Dakota Vehicle Registration for Cars, Vans, and Trucks
In order to complete the South Dakota vehicle registration process for cars, trucks, and vans, you must first fill out an Application for Motor Vehicle Registration/Title.  This application for SD vehicle registration must be signed by the owner(s) of the vehicle or by an authorized agent of the owner(s). If the SD vehicle registration application is signed by an authorized agent, this will require a power of attorney document attached to verify the appointment of an authorized agent.
If the motor vehicle was purchased outside of South Dakota, the South Dakota Vehicle registration must also include a bill of sale and a sales contract or purchase order. If the dealer price certification is not complete on form MV-608, the application for title, and the applicant bought the motor vehicle from a South Dakota dealer, the SD registration must also have a purchase order attached.
South Dakota Vehicle Registration for Motorcycles, Mopeds, and Motorbikes
In order to complete a South Dakota vehicle registration for a motorcycle, moped, or a motorbike, you need to fill out an Application for Motor Vehicle Title and Registration for the county of your residence.  The SD registration application must be signed by the owner(s) or by the authorized agent for the owner(s).  If the SD registration application is signed by the authorized agent, it will require an attached a power of attorney document to verify the appointment. This registration also requires a purchase order, bill of sale, or a sales contract if the Dealer Price Certification is not filled out on the SD vehicle application. You must also attach the manufacturer’s statement of origin or the properly transferred title to the applicant.
South Dakota Vehicle Registration Fees
There are many applicable fees for a South Dakota vehicle registration. The standard fees that apply to a SD registration include the following:
• Title Fee of $5.00
• Lien Fee of $5.00
• Solid Waste Fee of $1.00
• Mailing Fee of $5.00
• Late Title Application Penalty Fee of $1.00 per week after your thirty (30) day grace period. The maximum late fine is $50.
The SD vehicle registration fees are the following:
• Non-commercial vehicle fees: Based on vehicle weight and vehicle age, ranges from $1.75 to $138.75
• Motorcycle vehicle fees: Based on engine size and age, ranges from $.70 to $21.75

Lemon Law by State

Lemon Law by State

What is the Lemon Law?
Lemon laws are both federal and state laws in the United States that give a remedy for purchasers of motor vehicles in order to compensate them for vehicles that repeatedly are unable to meet quality and performance standards. These motors vehicles are referred to as lemons. The federal lemon law, more formally known as the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act protects United States citizens of all states. The lemon laws for each state vary and may not necessarily apply to leased and used cars. The rights provided to consumers by a lemon law can exceed the warranties explicitly expressed in the purchase contracts of the vehicles. Lemon law is the common name for these laws, but each individual state has different names for the acts and laws involved.
The lemon law on a federal level covers everything mechanical, not just motor vehicles. The federal lemon law also states that the warrantor of the product or vehicle may be obligated to pay the fees involved for the prevailing party’s attorney in a successful lemon suit, as do most lemon laws on a state level.
At the very core of most state lemon laws is the breach of warranty by the manufacturer. A manufacturer’s warranty is the legal document that makes the manufacturer liable for any repairs to the consumer’s good or vehicle. The warranty is a legal form of guarantee. An express warranty is usually a written warranty. Unlike an express warranty, an implied warranty is not written. A lemon law imposes these legal obligations on the seller, the manufacturer, or both as a matter of public policy. These policies found in the lemon laws can vary on a state by state basis. 
Lemon laws may also apply to situations when the vehicle is not under actually warranty, particularly if the seller of the vehicle failed to disclose any critical information such as previous damage of the vehicle to the buyer. Knowingly buying a car in the “as is” condition does not eliminate the buyer’s rights under the applicable lemon laws of the state.  Lemon laws are not limited to just automobiles and passenger cars. Lemon laws can also apply to boats, RVs, motorcycle, and even wheelchairs.
Alabama Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any motor vehicle intended mainly for operation and use on the public state highways that is self-propelled. The laws exclude motor homes or vehicles with a gross vehicle weight exceeding 10,000 pounds.
• Repair Interval: 30 calendar days out of service or 3 attempts to repair.
• Coverage Period: 12,000 miles or 1 year.
Alaska Lemon Law
• Coverage: All land vehicle that have at least four wheels, that is self-propelled due to a motor, and is usually used for family, household or personal purposes, and has to be registered by law. It does not cover tractors, farm vehicles, or vehicles designed mainly for off-road use.
• Repair Interval: 30 calendar days out of service or 3 attempts to repair.
• Coverage Period: The warranty period or 1 year.
Arizona Lemon Law
• Coverage: All self-propelled vehicles that are only designated for the transportation of property or people over public highways. The chassis section of a motor home is covered under the lemon law.
• Repair Interval: 30 calendar days out of service 4 attempts to repair.
• Coverage Period: 2 years, warranty period, or 24,000 miles.
Arkansas Lemon Law
• Coverage: All self-propelled vehicles purchased, leased, or licensed and mainly designed for transporting people or property over the highways and public streets, excluding include motorcycles, mopeds, living facilities of a motor home, and vehicles over a gross vehicle weight of 10,000 pounds. This 10,000 pound limit is not applicable to motor homes.
• Repair Interval: 1 attempt to repair for a defect that may cause serious injury or death, or 3 attempts to repair the same defect or 5 attempts to repair for different problems, or 30 calendar days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 2 years or 24,000 miles.
California Lemon Law
• Coverage: A new vehicle that is bought for use or used mainly for personal, household, or family purposes. Coverage includes the chassis section of motor homes.
• Repair Interval: 2 attempts to repair for a defect that can potentially cause death or serious injury or 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 18 months or 18,000 miles
Colorado Lemon Law
• Coverage: A private self-propelled passenger vehicle, including vans and pickup trucks, designed mainly for travel on public highways and used to carry a maximum of 10 people. Coverage excludes motorcycles and motor homes.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Connecticut Lemon Law
• Coverage: Passenger and commercial motor vehicles.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 2 years or 18,000 miles.
Delaware Lemon Law
• Coverage: Passenger motor vehicles. Does not include motor homes, other than the chassis portion, or motorcycles.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Florida Lemon Law
• Coverage: A new motor vehicle that is leased or purchased primarily for family, personal, or household purposes. Coverage does not include vehicles that run only on tracks, trucks over 10,000 pounds gross weight, off-road vehicles, the living facilities of recreational vehicles, mopeds, or motorcycles.
• Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 24 months.
Georgia Lemon Law
• Coverage: All self-propelled vehicles, designed primarily for the transportation of people or property over public highways that was purchased, leased, or registered. Coverage applies only to the chassis of a motor home. Coverage does not include trucks or motorcycles with 10,000 pounds or more gross vehicle weight.
• Repair Interval: 1 repair attempt in the braking or steering system or 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service for other problems.
• Coverage Period: 1 year or 12,000 miles.
Hawaii Lemon Law
• Coverage: All self-propelled vehicles designed primarily for the transportation of people or property over public highways and streets which are used primarily for family, household, or personal purposes. Coverage does not include motorcycles, mopeds, motor scooters, or other vehicles over 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight.
• Repair Interval: 1 repair attempt for a defect that might cause death or serious injury or 3 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period, 2 years or 24,000 miles.
Idaho Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any new motor vehicle used for personal, family or household purposes or personal business use. Coverage does not include a farm tractor, trailer motorcycle, or any vehicle with a gross laden weight exceeding 12,000 pounds.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period, 2 years or 24,000 miles.
Illinois Lemon Law
• Coverage: New cars. Light trucks and vans less than 8,000 pounds. Coverage also includes recreational vehicles excluding trailers. Coverage also excludes motorcycles.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 1 year or 12,000 miles.
Indiana Lemon Law
• Coverage: A self-propelled vehicle that has a gross vehicle weight of up to 10,000 pounds and is primarily intended for operation and use on public highways. Coverage does not include conversion vans, farm machinery, motor homes, motorcycles, snowmobiles, mopeds, or vehicles designed mainly for off-road use.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 18 months or 18,000 miles.
Iowa Lemon Law
• Coverage: A self-propelled vehicle leased or purchased and primarily made for the transportation of people or property over public highways and streets. Coverage does not include motorcycles, mopeds, motor homes, or vehicles that have a gross vehicle weight over 10,000 pounds. 
• Repair Interval: 1 repair attempt for a defect that might cause death or serious injury or 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service for other problems.
• Coverage Period: 2 years or 24,000 miles.
Kansas Lemon Law
• Coverage: A new motor vehicle that is leased or sold, and is registered with a gross weight of a maximum of 12,000 pounds. Coverage for the Kansas Lemon law does not include the customized parts of any motor vehicles that have been modified or added on to by a second stage manufacturer, first stage converter or a second stage converter.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair for the same defect, or 10 attempts to repair for seperate problems or 30 calendar days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Kentucky Lemon Law
• Coverage: All vehicles except conversion motor homes, farm machinery, mopeds, vans, motorcycles, and any vehicles with more than 2 axles.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 1 year or 12,000 miles.
Louisiana Lemon Law
• Coverage: All vehicles with a gross vehicle weight less than 10,000 pounds except motorcycles, motor homes, and vehicles used for commercial purposes only.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Maine Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any vehicle leased or purchased. Coverage excludes commercial vehicles over 8,000 pounds.
• Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 15 business days out of service
• Coverage Period: 2 years or 18,000 miles.
Maryland Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any truck or passenger car with a rated capacity of up to 1 ton.
• Repair Interval: 1 repair attempt in the braking or steering system or 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service for other mechanical problems.
• Coverage Period: 15 months or 15,000 miles. 12 months or 12,000 miles for leased vehicles.
Massachusetts Lemon Law
• Coverage: All vehicles, except off-road vehicles, motor homes, motorcycles, and vehicles used for commercial purposes.
• Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 15 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 1 year or 15,000 miles.
Michigan Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any new car, truck, or van purchased by a resident of Michigan for family or personal use.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Minnesota Lemon Law


• Coverage: Any new motor vehicle used for family, household, or personal purposes at least 40% of the time.
• Repair Interval: 1 repair attempt in the braking or steering system or 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service for other problems.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 2 years.
Mississippi Lemon Law


• Coverage: Any motor vehicles used mainly for family, household, or personal purposes. Coverage of Mississippi lemon laws excludes off-road vehicles, motorcycle, and mopeds. Coverage does include the chassis of a motor home.
• Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 15 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Missouri Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any new motor vehicle, used primarily for family, personal, or household purposes. Coverage does not include commercial motor vehicles, mopeds, motorcycles, off-road motor vehicles, or recreational vehicles. 
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Montana Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any motor vehicle, including the nonresidential part of a motor home, self-propelled and designed mainly to transport people or property upon public highways and roads. Coverage under the Montana lemon law does not include trucks with a gross vehicle weight of 10,000 pounds or more or motorcycles.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service
• Coverage Period: 2 years or 18,000 miles.
Nebraska Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any new motor vehicle typically used for houseful, family, personal, or business purposes, excluding motor homes.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 40 days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Nevada Lemon Law


• Coverage: A new motor vehicle normally used for personal, family or household purposes, with the exception of an off-road vehicle or a motor home.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
New Hampshire Lemon Law
Coverage: Any four-wheel motor vehicle that has a gross weight which does not exceed 9,000 pounds. This also includes off-highway recreational vehicles, motorcycles, and mopeds.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service
Coverage Period: Warranty period plus an additional 1 year.
New Jersey Lemon Law
Coverage: All passenger automobiles and motorcycles. Coverage also includes the non-living sections of a motor home.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service.
Coverage Period: 2 years or 18,000 miles.
New Mexico Lemon Law
Coverage: All passenger motor vehicles including automobiles, pickup trucks, motorcycles or vans normally used for family, household, or personal purposes that have a gross vehicle weight that does not exceed 10,000 pounds.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
New York Lemon Law
Coverage: All non-commercial motor vehicles leased or purchased, with the exception of motorcycles, certain motor homes, and all off-road vehicles.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service.
Coverage Period: 2 years or 18,000 miles.
North Carolina Lemon Law
Coverage: All new motor vehicles other than any house trailers, provided that the motor vehicle does not have a gross vehicle weight that exceeds 10,000 pounds. This coverage includes motorcycles, pickup trucks, and most vans.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or more than 20 days out of service during any 12 month period.
Coverage Period: 2 years or 24,000 miles.
North Dakota Lemon Law
Coverage: Passenger vehicles and trucks that have a gross vehicle weight of up to 10,000 pounds, usually used for personal, household, or family purposes.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Ohio Lemon Law
Coverage: Passenger cars, light trucks (trucks cannot exceed one ton load capacity and they cannot be used for business), or motorcycles. Coverage also includes the chassis section of motor homes.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service. 8 attempts to repair for different problems. 1 attempt to repair condition likely to cause death or serious bodily injury
Coverage Period: 1 year or 18,000 miles.
Oklahoma Lemon Law
Coverage: All motor driven vehicles that are required to be registered, excluding motor vehicles that have a gross vehicle weight above 10,000 pounds and the living facilities of any motor home.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 45 days out of service.
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Oregon Lemon Law
Coverage: Any new motor vehicles normally used for family, household, or personal purposes.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
Coverage Period: 1 year or 12,000 miles.
Pennsylvania Lemon Law
Coverage: Any motor vehicles used mainly for family, personal, or household purposes except motorcycles, motor homes, and off-road vehicles.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service
Coverage Period: Warranty period, 1 year or 12,000 miles.
Rhode Island Lemon Law
Coverage: Any automobiles, trucks, motorcycles, or vans with a gross vehicle weight that does not exceed 10,000 pounds.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service
Coverage Period: 1 year or 15,000 miles.
South Carolina Lemon Law
Coverage: Passenger motor vehicles including cars, small trucks, and vans.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service
Coverage Period: 1 year or 12,000 miles.
South Dakota Lemon Law
Coverage: All motor vehicles intended mainly for operation and use on public roads and highways and are self-propelled. Coverage does not include any motor homes or motor vehicles with a gross vehicle weight of 10,000 pounds or more.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair plus 1 final attempt.
Coverage Period: 1 year or 12,000 miles.
Tennessee Lemon Law
Coverage: All motor vehicles not including motor homes, motorized bicycles, recreational vehicles, off-road vehicles, and motor vehicles with a gross vehicle weight over 10,000 pounds.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Texas Lemon Law
Coverage: Any new vehicles, including cars, vans, motorcycles, trucks, motor homes, all-terrain vehicles, and towable recreational vehicles.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 days out of service. 2 attempts to repair for a serious safety hazard.
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Utah Lemon Law
Coverage: Any cars or trucks with a gross vehicle weight less than 12,000 pounds, or a motor home.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Vermont Lemon Law
Coverage: All passenger vehicles and trucks with a gross vehicle weight less than 10,000 pounds. Coverage does not include motorcycles, mopeds, snowmobiles, or the living section of recreational vehicles.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service.
Coverage Period: Warranty period.
Virginia Lemon Law


Coverage: All motor vehicle used in large part for family, household, or personal purposes.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service. 1 repair attempt for a serious safety defect.
Coverage Period: 18 months.
Washington Lemon Law
Coverage: All new self-propelled vehicles, including new motorcycles, mainly designed for the transportation of people or property over public highways and roads. Coverage does not include living sections of motor homes or trucks with a gross vehicle weight exceeding 19,000.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service. 2 attempts for a serious safety defect.
Coverage Period: 2 years or 24,000 miles.
West Virginia Lemon Law
Coverage: All Passenger vehicles, vans, pickup trucks, and the chassis of a motor home used  mainly for family, household, or personal purposes.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service. 1 attempt for a condition likely to cause death or serious bodily injury.
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Wisconsin Lemon Law
Coverage: All motor vehicles except mopeds and semi-trailers or trailers designed to be used in combination with a truck tractor or truck.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 days out of service
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Wyoming Lemon Law
Coverage: All motor vehicles with a gross vehicle weight less than 10,000 pounds.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service
Coverage Period: 1 year.