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Free VIN Check

Free VIN Check

If you are checking out many potential cars to purchase, you may want to look for a free VIN check. However, most free VIN checks are actually a scam, or they charge for their services in other ways. Alternatively, other free VIN checks only provide minimal information regarding a vehicle, which may not be enough for you when considering a vehicle. One of the best free VIN checks are provided by the National Insurance Crime Bureau. 
This free service from the National Insurance Crime Bureau lets you know if a used motor vehicle’s VIN is found in a database of stolen vehicles. Although this is all the National Insurance Crime Bureau free VIN check shows, it is important to do this in order to prevent this situation. No prospective car buyer should purchase any vehicle, especially any vehicle on the most stolen list, without obtaining a free VIN report from a free VIN check first. 
The National Insurance Crime Bureau free VIN check is a service provided to the public in order to assist in figuring out if a vehicle has been previously reported as stolen, but has not recovered, or has been previously reported as a declared total loss or salvage vehicle by cooperating National Insurance Crime Bureau members. In order to perform a search of the vehicle, you must have the vehicle’s VIN available. A maximum of give free VIN checks can be done within a 24-hour period.
The free VIN report and free VIN check services are offered by the National Insurance Crime Bureau and through many other car report companies. The free VIN report not only tells you whether a car motor vehicle has been stolen, in some cases the free VIN report can also tell you whether the motor vehicle has been. Often, people get the free VIN check first before buying the free VIN report, because if the motor vehicle has been stolen or salvaged, there is no reason to purchase the not-free report. 
Not only does the National Insurance Crime Bureau provide these free VIN checks, but they also provide a list of the 10 most stolen cars. You should take precaution when purchasing these vehicles:
• Honda Accord (1994)
• Honda Civic (1995)
• Toyota Camry (1991)
• Chevrolet Pickup (1999 Full Size)
• Ford F150 Series/Pickup (1997)
• Dodge Ram (2004)
• Dodge Caravan (2000)
• Acura Integra (1994)
• Ford Explorer (2002)
• Ford Taurus (1999)
Getting a Free VIN Report 
While your options may be extremely limited in finding a free VIN check in order to receive a free VIN report, there are still some ways to get more information about a used vehicle before a purchase. You may want to get this report because while the free VIN check from the National Insurance Crime Bureau tells you if the vehicle was stolen, a free VIN report will not give too much information on the following: 
• Lemon title
• Flood, fire, hail, frame or other major damage
• Severe accident
• Salvage title
• Multiple owners
• Odometer rollback
• Theft
• Title washing
• Police, driver education, taxi or any other problematic use history
Furthermore, with a free VIN report, you may not be able to do the following:
• Confirm ownership, service history, and mileage of the vehicle
• Check for any active recalls of bulletins
• Check the availability of an extended warranty
• Check the status of the remaining factory warranty, if any
Finding a VIN for a free VIN Report
The VIN of your vehicle is normally found on the door frame of the vehicle on the driver’s side, although it can also be near the windshield on the dashboard. If you are performing a free VIN check on a used car, then the seller of the vehicle should be able to provide you with the VIN number. If the seller is unwilling to provide the VIN number, this is a very bad sign and you should immediately walk away from the sale of this vehicle because there may be significant problems with the vehicle.
You can then get a free VIN check or a free VIN report by searching for various websites that provide them. While the National Insurance Crime Bureau provides information, you may also wish to try other sources. Be very hesitant with sites that claim they can provide a free VIN report but then still ask for your billing information or charge you on a regular basis. 
You will need to put in the vehicle’s VIN number where directed on a site in order to get the free VIN report. Some websites may email you the report while others will display it immediately on your screen. These free VIN reports will not provide a full history of the car, but they will let you know whether the car has been stolen, had a salvaged title, taken part in a crime, or more. Based on the free VIN report, you can decide if the vehicle is worth purchasing.
You can also use the vehicle’s VIN number to get a used car free VIN report. You can check how many reports have been previously filed for the vehicle. If you notice that there are many reports filed, then you might want to more closely inspect the used vehicle. Be aware that the used car report is not the same as a VIN report. Used vehicle reports usually are not free and they require a fee.
Insurance companies are usually the ones who manage the databases that contain all of the vehicle report information. These reports are given voluntary from the companies and are often based off of the reports for claims or other insurance issues. You can see if the vehicle is stolen, has ever been previously stolen, or if it has had any salvaged titles. You will not be given information about title changes, maintenance, major accidents, or other details.
If the vehicle has never been insured before, or if it was insured by a company that did not provide information for free VIN checks or free VIN reports, then you will not be able to get any helpful information regarding the history of that vehicle. Make sure you ask the appropriate questions regarding the history and the condition of the vehicle. Try and obtain documented proof for as much as possible about the vehicle. If you have doubts, you will need to make adjustments to the bill of sale, so both seller and buyer are satisfied.

A Guide to Motorcycle Helmet Laws

A Guide to Motorcycle Helmet Laws

Compared with passenger cars, motorcycles are much more dangerous as a form of travel. The United States federal government estimates that in 2007, for each mile traveled, the total number of deaths on motorcycles was about 37 times more than the number of deaths in cars. There were 5,112 deaths among motorcyclists in 2008 and 4,281 deaths in 2009. 
Often, motorcycles have excessive performance capabilities, such as rapid acceleration and high top speeds. Motorcycles are not as stable as cars in emergency braking situations and are less visible to other motorists. Motorcyclists are much more prone to accident injuries than car occupants since motorcycles are unenclosed, leaving motorcycles riders more vulnerable to contact with the road surfaces. This is why wearing protective clothing and helmets, is so important for motorcycle riders.
Helmets laws aim to work as a countermeasure for crash-related head injuries, which is a leading cause of death among riders who do not wear a helmet. Many other countries have helmet laws requiring all motorcyclists to wear helmets while riding, but less than half of the states in America have helmet laws in place. Many other states require certain riders to wear helmets under their helmet laws, but a few other states do not have any helmet laws in place.
Effectiveness of Helmet Laws
Based on various studies looking at the effects of states’ repeal, weakening, and enactment of universal helmet laws, helmet use get closer to 100 percent when all motorcyclists are required to wear helmets. This is compared to approximately 50 percent of motorcyclists using helmets when no helmet law is applicable. According to a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in 2010, 98 percent of motorcyclists were observed to wear helmets in states with universal helmet laws. In states without universal helmet laws, helmet use was only 48 percent in 2010. When considering helmets that were compliant with federal safety regulations, proper helmet use was at 76 percent in 2010 in states with universal helmet laws, as opposed to 40 percent in states without universal helmet laws.
Helmet Laws in the United States
Currently, 47 states as well as Guam, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the United States Virgin Islands have helmet laws in place for motorcyclists. Out of these states with helmet laws, 20 of the states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the United States Virgin Islands have a helmet law that is universal for all riders. The other 27 states as well as Guam have specific helmet specifications. Only three states do not have motorcycle helmet laws at all. These states are Illinois, Iowa, and New Hampshire.
States by State Helmet Laws 
• States with universal helmet laws: Alabama, California, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin
• States with partial Laws: Alaska (17 and younger), Arizona (17 and younger), Arkansas (20 and younger), Colorado (17 and younger for both drivers and passengers), Connecticut (17 and younger), Delaware (18 and younger), Florida (20 and younger), Hawaii (17 and younger), Idaho (17 and younger), Indiana (17 and younger), Kansas (17 and younger), Kentucky (20 and younger), Maine (17 and younger), Minnesota (17 and younger), Montana (17 and younger), New Mexico (17 and younger), North Dakota (17 and younger), Ohio  (17 and younger), Oklahoma (17 and younger), Pennsylvania (20 and younger), Rhode Island (20 and younger), South Carolina (20 and younger), South Dakota (17 and younger), Texas (20 and younger), Utah (17 and younger), Wisconsin (17 and younger), Wyoming (17 and younger)

South Dakota Vehicle Registration

South Dakota Vehicle Registration

All vehicles in the state of South Dakota must be properly titled and have SD vehicle registrations in order to operate legally on South Dakota roadways. Any nonresident who is moving into the state of South Dakota has 90 days to apply for SD registration and title a vehicle. A title is the legal document that declares the ownership of the motor vehicle.  Whenever a motor vehicle is sold, the title has to be transferred to the buyer of the vehicle. This is required for a South Dakota Vehicle Registration.
South Dakota Vehicle Registration for Cars, Vans, and Trucks
In order to complete the South Dakota vehicle registration process for cars, trucks, and vans, you must first fill out an Application for Motor Vehicle Registration/Title.  This application for SD vehicle registration must be signed by the owner(s) of the vehicle or by an authorized agent of the owner(s). If the SD vehicle registration application is signed by an authorized agent, this will require a power of attorney document attached to verify the appointment of an authorized agent.
If the motor vehicle was purchased outside of South Dakota, the South Dakota Vehicle registration must also include a bill of sale and a sales contract or purchase order. If the dealer price certification is not complete on form MV-608, the application for title, and the applicant bought the motor vehicle from a South Dakota dealer, the SD registration must also have a purchase order attached.
South Dakota Vehicle Registration for Motorcycles, Mopeds, and Motorbikes
In order to complete a South Dakota vehicle registration for a motorcycle, moped, or a motorbike, you need to fill out an Application for Motor Vehicle Title and Registration for the county of your residence.  The SD registration application must be signed by the owner(s) or by the authorized agent for the owner(s).  If the SD registration application is signed by the authorized agent, it will require an attached a power of attorney document to verify the appointment. This registration also requires a purchase order, bill of sale, or a sales contract if the Dealer Price Certification is not filled out on the SD vehicle application. You must also attach the manufacturer’s statement of origin or the properly transferred title to the applicant.
South Dakota Vehicle Registration Fees
There are many applicable fees for a South Dakota vehicle registration. The standard fees that apply to a SD registration include the following:
• Title Fee of $5.00
• Lien Fee of $5.00
• Solid Waste Fee of $1.00
• Mailing Fee of $5.00
• Late Title Application Penalty Fee of $1.00 per week after your thirty (30) day grace period. The maximum late fine is $50.
The SD vehicle registration fees are the following:
• Non-commercial vehicle fees: Based on vehicle weight and vehicle age, ranges from $1.75 to $138.75
• Motorcycle vehicle fees: Based on engine size and age, ranges from $.70 to $21.75

Lemon Law by State

Lemon Law by State

What is the Lemon Law?
Lemon laws are both federal and state laws in the United States that give a remedy for purchasers of motor vehicles in order to compensate them for vehicles that repeatedly are unable to meet quality and performance standards. These motors vehicles are referred to as lemons. The federal lemon law, more formally known as the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act protects United States citizens of all states. The lemon laws for each state vary and may not necessarily apply to leased and used cars. The rights provided to consumers by a lemon law can exceed the warranties explicitly expressed in the purchase contracts of the vehicles. Lemon law is the common name for these laws, but each individual state has different names for the acts and laws involved.
The lemon law on a federal level covers everything mechanical, not just motor vehicles. The federal lemon law also states that the warrantor of the product or vehicle may be obligated to pay the fees involved for the prevailing party’s attorney in a successful lemon suit, as do most lemon laws on a state level.
At the very core of most state lemon laws is the breach of warranty by the manufacturer. A manufacturer’s warranty is the legal document that makes the manufacturer liable for any repairs to the consumer’s good or vehicle. The warranty is a legal form of guarantee. An express warranty is usually a written warranty. Unlike an express warranty, an implied warranty is not written. A lemon law imposes these legal obligations on the seller, the manufacturer, or both as a matter of public policy. These policies found in the lemon laws can vary on a state by state basis. 
Lemon laws may also apply to situations when the vehicle is not under actually warranty, particularly if the seller of the vehicle failed to disclose any critical information such as previous damage of the vehicle to the buyer. Knowingly buying a car in the “as is” condition does not eliminate the buyer’s rights under the applicable lemon laws of the state.  Lemon laws are not limited to just automobiles and passenger cars. Lemon laws can also apply to boats, RVs, motorcycle, and even wheelchairs.
Alabama Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any motor vehicle intended mainly for operation and use on the public state highways that is self-propelled. The laws exclude motor homes or vehicles with a gross vehicle weight exceeding 10,000 pounds.
• Repair Interval: 30 calendar days out of service or 3 attempts to repair.
• Coverage Period: 12,000 miles or 1 year.
Alaska Lemon Law
• Coverage: All land vehicle that have at least four wheels, that is self-propelled due to a motor, and is usually used for family, household or personal purposes, and has to be registered by law. It does not cover tractors, farm vehicles, or vehicles designed mainly for off-road use.
• Repair Interval: 30 calendar days out of service or 3 attempts to repair.
• Coverage Period: The warranty period or 1 year.
Arizona Lemon Law
• Coverage: All self-propelled vehicles that are only designated for the transportation of property or people over public highways. The chassis section of a motor home is covered under the lemon law.
• Repair Interval: 30 calendar days out of service 4 attempts to repair.
• Coverage Period: 2 years, warranty period, or 24,000 miles.
Arkansas Lemon Law
• Coverage: All self-propelled vehicles purchased, leased, or licensed and mainly designed for transporting people or property over the highways and public streets, excluding include motorcycles, mopeds, living facilities of a motor home, and vehicles over a gross vehicle weight of 10,000 pounds. This 10,000 pound limit is not applicable to motor homes.
• Repair Interval: 1 attempt to repair for a defect that may cause serious injury or death, or 3 attempts to repair the same defect or 5 attempts to repair for different problems, or 30 calendar days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 2 years or 24,000 miles.
California Lemon Law
• Coverage: A new vehicle that is bought for use or used mainly for personal, household, or family purposes. Coverage includes the chassis section of motor homes.
• Repair Interval: 2 attempts to repair for a defect that can potentially cause death or serious injury or 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 18 months or 18,000 miles
Colorado Lemon Law
• Coverage: A private self-propelled passenger vehicle, including vans and pickup trucks, designed mainly for travel on public highways and used to carry a maximum of 10 people. Coverage excludes motorcycles and motor homes.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Connecticut Lemon Law
• Coverage: Passenger and commercial motor vehicles.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 2 years or 18,000 miles.
Delaware Lemon Law
• Coverage: Passenger motor vehicles. Does not include motor homes, other than the chassis portion, or motorcycles.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Florida Lemon Law
• Coverage: A new motor vehicle that is leased or purchased primarily for family, personal, or household purposes. Coverage does not include vehicles that run only on tracks, trucks over 10,000 pounds gross weight, off-road vehicles, the living facilities of recreational vehicles, mopeds, or motorcycles.
• Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 24 months.
Georgia Lemon Law
• Coverage: All self-propelled vehicles, designed primarily for the transportation of people or property over public highways that was purchased, leased, or registered. Coverage applies only to the chassis of a motor home. Coverage does not include trucks or motorcycles with 10,000 pounds or more gross vehicle weight.
• Repair Interval: 1 repair attempt in the braking or steering system or 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service for other problems.
• Coverage Period: 1 year or 12,000 miles.
Hawaii Lemon Law
• Coverage: All self-propelled vehicles designed primarily for the transportation of people or property over public highways and streets which are used primarily for family, household, or personal purposes. Coverage does not include motorcycles, mopeds, motor scooters, or other vehicles over 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight.
• Repair Interval: 1 repair attempt for a defect that might cause death or serious injury or 3 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period, 2 years or 24,000 miles.
Idaho Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any new motor vehicle used for personal, family or household purposes or personal business use. Coverage does not include a farm tractor, trailer motorcycle, or any vehicle with a gross laden weight exceeding 12,000 pounds.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period, 2 years or 24,000 miles.
Illinois Lemon Law
• Coverage: New cars. Light trucks and vans less than 8,000 pounds. Coverage also includes recreational vehicles excluding trailers. Coverage also excludes motorcycles.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 1 year or 12,000 miles.
Indiana Lemon Law
• Coverage: A self-propelled vehicle that has a gross vehicle weight of up to 10,000 pounds and is primarily intended for operation and use on public highways. Coverage does not include conversion vans, farm machinery, motor homes, motorcycles, snowmobiles, mopeds, or vehicles designed mainly for off-road use.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 18 months or 18,000 miles.
Iowa Lemon Law
• Coverage: A self-propelled vehicle leased or purchased and primarily made for the transportation of people or property over public highways and streets. Coverage does not include motorcycles, mopeds, motor homes, or vehicles that have a gross vehicle weight over 10,000 pounds. 
• Repair Interval: 1 repair attempt for a defect that might cause death or serious injury or 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service for other problems.
• Coverage Period: 2 years or 24,000 miles.
Kansas Lemon Law
• Coverage: A new motor vehicle that is leased or sold, and is registered with a gross weight of a maximum of 12,000 pounds. Coverage for the Kansas Lemon law does not include the customized parts of any motor vehicles that have been modified or added on to by a second stage manufacturer, first stage converter or a second stage converter.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair for the same defect, or 10 attempts to repair for seperate problems or 30 calendar days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Kentucky Lemon Law
• Coverage: All vehicles except conversion motor homes, farm machinery, mopeds, vans, motorcycles, and any vehicles with more than 2 axles.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 1 year or 12,000 miles.
Louisiana Lemon Law
• Coverage: All vehicles with a gross vehicle weight less than 10,000 pounds except motorcycles, motor homes, and vehicles used for commercial purposes only.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Maine Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any vehicle leased or purchased. Coverage excludes commercial vehicles over 8,000 pounds.
• Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 15 business days out of service
• Coverage Period: 2 years or 18,000 miles.
Maryland Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any truck or passenger car with a rated capacity of up to 1 ton.
• Repair Interval: 1 repair attempt in the braking or steering system or 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service for other mechanical problems.
• Coverage Period: 15 months or 15,000 miles. 12 months or 12,000 miles for leased vehicles.
Massachusetts Lemon Law
• Coverage: All vehicles, except off-road vehicles, motor homes, motorcycles, and vehicles used for commercial purposes.
• Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 15 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: 1 year or 15,000 miles.
Michigan Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any new car, truck, or van purchased by a resident of Michigan for family or personal use.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Minnesota Lemon Law


• Coverage: Any new motor vehicle used for family, household, or personal purposes at least 40% of the time.
• Repair Interval: 1 repair attempt in the braking or steering system or 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service for other problems.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 2 years.
Mississippi Lemon Law


• Coverage: Any motor vehicles used mainly for family, household, or personal purposes. Coverage of Mississippi lemon laws excludes off-road vehicles, motorcycle, and mopeds. Coverage does include the chassis of a motor home.
• Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 15 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Missouri Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any new motor vehicle, used primarily for family, personal, or household purposes. Coverage does not include commercial motor vehicles, mopeds, motorcycles, off-road motor vehicles, or recreational vehicles. 
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Montana Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any motor vehicle, including the nonresidential part of a motor home, self-propelled and designed mainly to transport people or property upon public highways and roads. Coverage under the Montana lemon law does not include trucks with a gross vehicle weight of 10,000 pounds or more or motorcycles.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service
• Coverage Period: 2 years or 18,000 miles.
Nebraska Lemon Law
• Coverage: Any new motor vehicle typically used for houseful, family, personal, or business purposes, excluding motor homes.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 40 days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Nevada Lemon Law


• Coverage: A new motor vehicle normally used for personal, family or household purposes, with the exception of an off-road vehicle or a motor home.
• Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service.
• Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
New Hampshire Lemon Law
Coverage: Any four-wheel motor vehicle that has a gross weight which does not exceed 9,000 pounds. This also includes off-highway recreational vehicles, motorcycles, and mopeds.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service
Coverage Period: Warranty period plus an additional 1 year.
New Jersey Lemon Law
Coverage: All passenger automobiles and motorcycles. Coverage also includes the non-living sections of a motor home.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service.
Coverage Period: 2 years or 18,000 miles.
New Mexico Lemon Law
Coverage: All passenger motor vehicles including automobiles, pickup trucks, motorcycles or vans normally used for family, household, or personal purposes that have a gross vehicle weight that does not exceed 10,000 pounds.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
New York Lemon Law
Coverage: All non-commercial motor vehicles leased or purchased, with the exception of motorcycles, certain motor homes, and all off-road vehicles.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service.
Coverage Period: 2 years or 18,000 miles.
North Carolina Lemon Law
Coverage: All new motor vehicles other than any house trailers, provided that the motor vehicle does not have a gross vehicle weight that exceeds 10,000 pounds. This coverage includes motorcycles, pickup trucks, and most vans.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or more than 20 days out of service during any 12 month period.
Coverage Period: 2 years or 24,000 miles.
North Dakota Lemon Law
Coverage: Passenger vehicles and trucks that have a gross vehicle weight of up to 10,000 pounds, usually used for personal, household, or family purposes.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Ohio Lemon Law
Coverage: Passenger cars, light trucks (trucks cannot exceed one ton load capacity and they cannot be used for business), or motorcycles. Coverage also includes the chassis section of motor homes.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service. 8 attempts to repair for different problems. 1 attempt to repair condition likely to cause death or serious bodily injury
Coverage Period: 1 year or 18,000 miles.
Oklahoma Lemon Law
Coverage: All motor driven vehicles that are required to be registered, excluding motor vehicles that have a gross vehicle weight above 10,000 pounds and the living facilities of any motor home.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 45 days out of service.
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Oregon Lemon Law
Coverage: Any new motor vehicles normally used for family, household, or personal purposes.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
Coverage Period: 1 year or 12,000 miles.
Pennsylvania Lemon Law
Coverage: Any motor vehicles used mainly for family, personal, or household purposes except motorcycles, motor homes, and off-road vehicles.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service
Coverage Period: Warranty period, 1 year or 12,000 miles.
Rhode Island Lemon Law
Coverage: Any automobiles, trucks, motorcycles, or vans with a gross vehicle weight that does not exceed 10,000 pounds.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service
Coverage Period: 1 year or 15,000 miles.
South Carolina Lemon Law
Coverage: Passenger motor vehicles including cars, small trucks, and vans.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service
Coverage Period: 1 year or 12,000 miles.
South Dakota Lemon Law
Coverage: All motor vehicles intended mainly for operation and use on public roads and highways and are self-propelled. Coverage does not include any motor homes or motor vehicles with a gross vehicle weight of 10,000 pounds or more.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair plus 1 final attempt.
Coverage Period: 1 year or 12,000 miles.
Tennessee Lemon Law
Coverage: All motor vehicles not including motor homes, motorized bicycles, recreational vehicles, off-road vehicles, and motor vehicles with a gross vehicle weight over 10,000 pounds.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Texas Lemon Law
Coverage: Any new vehicles, including cars, vans, motorcycles, trucks, motor homes, all-terrain vehicles, and towable recreational vehicles.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 days out of service. 2 attempts to repair for a serious safety hazard.
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Utah Lemon Law
Coverage: Any cars or trucks with a gross vehicle weight less than 12,000 pounds, or a motor home.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service.
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Vermont Lemon Law
Coverage: All passenger vehicles and trucks with a gross vehicle weight less than 10,000 pounds. Coverage does not include motorcycles, mopeds, snowmobiles, or the living section of recreational vehicles.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service.
Coverage Period: Warranty period.
Virginia Lemon Law


Coverage: All motor vehicle used in large part for family, household, or personal purposes.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service. 1 repair attempt for a serious safety defect.
Coverage Period: 18 months.
Washington Lemon Law
Coverage: All new self-propelled vehicles, including new motorcycles, mainly designed for the transportation of people or property over public highways and roads. Coverage does not include living sections of motor homes or trucks with a gross vehicle weight exceeding 19,000.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service. 2 attempts for a serious safety defect.
Coverage Period: 2 years or 24,000 miles.
West Virginia Lemon Law
Coverage: All Passenger vehicles, vans, pickup trucks, and the chassis of a motor home used  mainly for family, household, or personal purposes.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 calendar days out of service. 1 attempt for a condition likely to cause death or serious bodily injury.
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Wisconsin Lemon Law
Coverage: All motor vehicles except mopeds and semi-trailers or trailers designed to be used in combination with a truck tractor or truck.
Repair Interval: 4 attempts to repair or 30 days out of service
Coverage Period: Warranty period or 1 year.
Wyoming Lemon Law
Coverage: All motor vehicles with a gross vehicle weight less than 10,000 pounds.
Repair Interval: 3 attempts to repair or 30 business days out of service
Coverage Period: 1 year.